Call for Application: Pathways to Harm Reduction Drug Policy in Hong Kong and East & Southeast Asia: Principles, Process and Practices Annual Training 2022

Pathways to Harm Reduction Drug Policy in Hong Kong and East & Southeast Asia: Principles, Process and Practices Annual Training 2022 
  
The training will be held online via ZOOM from November 7-9, 2022. 
  
Apply by September 15, 2022 
  
The training will focus on the connections between harm reduction, public health, and drug policy as well as the gap between these principles and practice in the implementation of drug policies in Asia. The training will familiarize participants with the international drug control system, regional trends in drug markets (supply, transit and demand), and comparative case studies of alternative approaches to managing drug use in society as a health and social concern. The course will also look at priority areas and emerging challenges within the region, including death penalty and punitive sentencing policies, imprisonment of foreign nationals, women’s incarceration and impact of COVID-19. It is hoped that the training can provide insights on how participants may adopt measures to bring enforcement activities and domestic law in line with human rights obligations and explore pragmatic approaches that mitigate the adverse health and social consequences of both drug use and overly punitive drug policies.  
  
Course Content: 
  • Current Drug Trends, International Drug Control System & Impacts in Asia-Pacific 
  • Public Health and Drug Policy 
  • Death Penalty and Drug Offenses 
  • The Economics of Drug Markets and Drug Policies 
  • Long Term Imprisonment of Foreign Nationals for Drug Trafficking 
  • Women’s Incarceration for Drug Related Offenses 
Who should apply? 
  • Government staff working on drug policy and health 
  • Individuals from civil society working in public health, human rights, development, journalism, law, public policy, etc. with an interest in drug policy 
  • Researchers and junior faculty 
While priority is given to those working on drug policy, no prior knowledge of human rights or drug policy is required to apply. 
 
Eligible Regions: 
Individuals from countries in East Asia and Southeast Asia are encouraged to apply.  
 
Application Guidelines: 
Complete the application form and send to Ms. Leona Li/Velda Chui at rifhrhub@hku.hk along with a curriculum vitae. On the last page of the application, you should provide a personal statement that answers why the training is relevant to your current activities and what you expect to get out of the training. The program representative will provide confirmation of receiving your application within 3 working days and application results approximately within a month by email. 

John Jay College of Criminal Justice: Position of Assistant Professor in International Criminal Justice

John Jay College of Criminal Justice invites social scientists in the interdisciplinary field of international criminal justice (ICJ) to apply for a tenure-track, joint appointment in the ICJ BA and ICJ MA programs and in a department to be determined by the candidate’s Ph.D. or area of research. (Possible home departments include Criminal Justice; Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration; Sociology; Political Science; Economics; Anthropology; Africana Studies; and Latin American and Latinx Studies, with all personnel matters handled through the home department). The position begins in Fall 2022.

Click here for more details of the position.

Research Project Introduction: Immigration Detention in Hong Kong

The project began in July 2020 and will run through June 2023. This will be the first detailed study of immigration detention in Hong Kong, and will add significantly to comparative analysis of immigration detention in East Asia.

The team, Prof. Surabhi Chopra, Raquel Amador and Chloe Fung from the Faculty of Law, Chinese University of Hong Kong, examines the functioning and effects of immigration detention law, policy and practice, with a focus on survivors of torture, victims of human trafficking, and low-income migrant workers.

Based upon their findings, they develop actionable, evidence-based guidelines for improving the system.

This project is funded by the Research Impact Fund of the Hong Kong Research Grants Council, which operates under the University Grants Committee (UGC).

For more information, see Immigration Detention in Hong Kong.

In Memory of Dr. Robert Newman

In Memory of Dr. Robert Newman

It saddens us to announce that Dr. Robert Newman, one of the advisors to the Hong Kong Government when the methadone programme was set up in the 1970s, passed away on 1 August 2018.

Dr. Newman's contributions to Hong Kong's methadone programme have served the community well for over four decades, and is a successful example in the region of community-based harm reduction. It was our centre’s greatest honor, together with Open Society Foundations, to have Dr. Newman reflect on the development of the methadone program at the launch of the report,Globally Informed, Locally Responsive: Hong Kong’s Common-Sense Approach to Expanding Methadone Treatment in 2017. In his reflections, he underscored the role methadone has played in Hong Kong's drug treatment approach, providing an essential service to those living with opioid dependance as well as the successful control of HIV and Hepatitis C infection.

He will be remembered deeply. Our condolences to his families and friends.

You may read more about his work from the report on Methadone Program. 

Here is  Obituary on New York Times.