Our Research

We encourage and help to facilitate applied research making best use of a partnership between academics and practitioners. Emphasis will be placed on research that meets the following criteria:

  1. Meets a perceived need.
  2. Encourages partnership between academics and practitioners.
  3. Contributes to taught programmes.
  4. Uses a multi-disciplinary approach.
  5. Is available for publication.

We assist academics to obtain funding from non-university sources to undertake research. We can be commissioned by either government agencies or the private sector to undertake action, survey, theoretical and evaluative research. The independence of the University and researchers of international repute ensures quality research on issues and problems faced by law enforcement and the security community.

  1. Opening Doors, Creating Pathways - A Qualitative Study of Social Harms and Service Access of Young People from Ethnic Minority Backgrounds in Hong Kong
  2. Investor Motivations and Fraud: Implications for Crime Prevention Education
  3. Study on Drug Taking Behaviors of Gay Men in Hong Kong
  4. Research project for prisoner criminogenic needs and effectiveness of intervention program
  5. Assessing the socioeconomic costs of drug abuse in Hong Kong SAR

Opening Doors, Creating Pathways - A Qualitative Study of Social Harms and Service Access of Young People from Ethnic Minority Backgrounds in Hong Kong

Funded by Public Policy Research (PPR)

This PPR research project aims to:

  1. Understand the lived experience of young people age 18-25 years from ethnic minority backgrounds living in Hong Kong
  2. Understand the extent to which young people from ethnic minority backgrounds are experiencing social harms
  3. Understand how and when young people from ethnic minority backgrounds access health and social welfare services and how these services respond to their needs
  4. Identify current gaps in service provision and/or models for young people from ethnic minority backgrounds
  5. Identify policy responses to address service gaps

Principle Investigator: Professor Karen A. Joe Laidler

Co-Investigator: Ms. Puja Kapai

Project Duration:  2017 - Present

 

Investor Motivations and Fraud: Implications for Crime Prevention Education

Funded by Investor Education Centre (IEC)

This study aims to:

  1. Assist the police in the identification, characteristics, and decision making process of groups vulnerable or at risk of investment fraud
  2. Draw from the research findings to collaborate with the police in strengthening their crime prevention and education strategies with a specific focus on vulnerable groups
  3. Draw from the research findings to assist the IEC in furthering their educational campaign for financial well-being.

Principle Investigator: Professor Karen A. Joe Laidler

Project Duration: 2017 - Present

 

Study on Drug Taking Behaviors of Gay Men in Hong Kong

Funded by Boys’ and Girls’ Club Association of Hong Kong

This is a highly significant research project which attempts to explore an understudied research area of the intersection between gay sexuality and drug taking behaviors. The findings will have significant implications for policymakers, social workers and NGOs responsible for strategizing and delivering intervention programs and counseling services tailored to the specific needs of drug-taking members of the local gay community. With better targeting on specific needs, this may lead to a reduction in health risks practices, and ultimately lower the HIV rates of this group (who are currently those at highest risk of HIV/AIDS in Hong Kong).

Principle Investigator: Dr. Kong, Travis Shiu Ki

Co- Investigator: Professor Karen A. Joe Laidler, Dr. Lau Sky Hoi Leung

Project Duration: 2017 -  Present

Research project for prisoner criminogenic needs and effectiveness of intervention program

Funded by The Society of Rehabilitation and Crime Prevention, Hong Kong

This is our 3rd round of research collaboration since 2015 with with SRACP and aims:

  1. To plan, organize and conduct group programme in the CSD
  2. To raise the prisoners’ awareness of their criminogenic problems
  3. To enhance their motivation to reduce the criminal behaviors after release
  4. To evaluate the programme’s effectiveness

Principle Investigator: Professor Karen A. Joe Laidler Project Duration: 2015-Present (3 rounds of funding)

Assessing the socioeconomic costs of drug abuse in Hong Kong SAR

Funded by Beat Drugs Fund

The proposed study aims to develop a conceptual framework for the estimation of socioeconomic costs of drug abuse in the context of Hong Kong. The need for a reliable estimate of the socioeconomic costs of drug abuse is almost self-evident. It is beyond doubted that the use of illicit drugs involves a large number of adverse health and social consequences. In assessing the possible impact of various strategies for anti-drug abuse, an internationally acceptable and policy appropriate measurement of the socioeconomic consequences is important to understand how much resources would be saved if drug abuse could be eradicated in the community. The proposed study will provide a reliable and internationally accepted estimate of socioeconomic costs that can serve four major purposes in reducing the risk of drug abuse or illicit drug use in Hong Kong. These include:

  1. a reliable estimate of socioeconomic costs helps to prioritize drug abuse issues on the public policy agenda;
  2. it provides useful information for targeting specific problems and policies;
  3. it helps to identify information gaps, research needs and desirable refinements to statistical reporting systems;
  4. it enhances the development of a more comprehensive and reliable framework in conducting economic evaluation on policies and programmes at reducing the harm associated with the use of illicit drugs in Hong Kong.

Principle Investigator: Professor Yip, Paul Siu Fai (director of Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, The University of Hong Kong) Co- Investigator: Professor Karen A. Joe Laidler Project Duration: 2015 - 2017