Call for Application: Pathways to Harm Reduction Drug Policy in Hong Kong and East & Southeast Asia: Principles, Process and Practices Annual Training 2022

Pathways to Harm Reduction Drug Policy in Hong Kong and East & Southeast Asia: Principles, Process and Practices Annual Training 2022 
  
The training will be held online via ZOOM from November 7-9, 2022. 
  
Apply by September 15, 2022 
  
The training will focus on the connections between harm reduction, public health, and drug policy as well as the gap between these principles and practice in the implementation of drug policies in Asia. The training will familiarize participants with the international drug control system, regional trends in drug markets (supply, transit and demand), and comparative case studies of alternative approaches to managing drug use in society as a health and social concern. The course will also look at priority areas and emerging challenges within the region, including death penalty and punitive sentencing policies, imprisonment of foreign nationals, women’s incarceration and impact of COVID-19. It is hoped that the training can provide insights on how participants may adopt measures to bring enforcement activities and domestic law in line with human rights obligations and explore pragmatic approaches that mitigate the adverse health and social consequences of both drug use and overly punitive drug policies.  
  
Course Content: 
  • Current Drug Trends, International Drug Control System & Impacts in Asia-Pacific 
  • Public Health and Drug Policy 
  • Death Penalty and Drug Offenses 
  • The Economics of Drug Markets and Drug Policies 
  • Long Term Imprisonment of Foreign Nationals for Drug Trafficking 
  • Women’s Incarceration for Drug Related Offenses 
Who should apply? 
  • Government staff working on drug policy and health 
  • Individuals from civil society working in public health, human rights, development, journalism, law, public policy, etc. with an interest in drug policy 
  • Researchers and junior faculty 
While priority is given to those working on drug policy, no prior knowledge of human rights or drug policy is required to apply. 
 
Eligible Regions: 
Individuals from countries in East Asia and Southeast Asia are encouraged to apply.  
 
Application Guidelines: 
Complete the application form and send to Ms. Leona Li/Velda Chui at rifhrhub@hku.hk along with a curriculum vitae. On the last page of the application, you should provide a personal statement that answers why the training is relevant to your current activities and what you expect to get out of the training. The program representative will provide confirmation of receiving your application within 3 working days and application results approximately within a month by email. 

Report Launch: Hong Kong’s Common-Sense Approach to Expanding Methadone Treatment

While a number of countries are experimenting with new approaches to drug policy, across much of Asia aggressive drug policies continue to prevail, as seen in the Philippines and Indonesia. One exception to that trend is Hong Kong’s methadone treatment program that was informed by global best practice but localized for the needs of Hong Kong. It is a bright spot in the region that can serve as a model for other countries that want to develop and enact drug policies rooted in public health and social support.

Started in 1975 in response to a growing health and social crises with a growing number of opiate-dependent, heroin-injecting residents, the Hong Kong methadone program aims to make drug treatment accessible to all who need and want it through its 20 clinics around the territory. Not only has Hong Kong’s methadone treatment approach provided an essential service to those living with opioid addiction, but it has also contributed to the successful control of HIV and Hepatitis C infection. The program’s success hinges on a number of qualities including accessible hours and locations, robust staffing and an understanding that abstinence should not be the only goal when supporting people with drug dependency.
Panelists include:

  • Dr. Robert Newman, MD, MPH, President Emeritus, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York (Author)
  • Professor . Shui Shan Lee, Deputy Director of Stanley Ho Centre for Emerging Infectious Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Dr. Addi KH Chan, Senior Medical & Health Officer, Department of Health, HKSAR
  • Dr. Kasia Malinowska, Director of the Global Drug Policy Program, Open Society Foundations
  • Prof. Karen A Joe Laidler, Director of Centre for Criminology, The University of Hong Kong (moderator)

 

Human Rights and Drug Policy in East & Southeast Asia 2017

The workshop will focus on the connections between human rights, public health, and drug policy as well as the gap between these principles and practice in the implementation of drug policies in Asia. The workshop will familiarize participants with the international drug control system, regional trends in drug markets (supply, transit and demand), and comparative case studies of alternative approaches to managing drug use in society as a health and social concern. The course will also look are recent trends in the Americas and Europe with a critical eye, exploring new and emerging challenges. It is hoped that the workshop can provide insights on how participants may adopt measures to bring enforcement activities and domestic law in line with human rights obligations and explore pragmatic approaches that mitigate the adverse health and social consequences of both drug use and overly punitive drug policies.

For more details, click here.

 

 

Overseas Filipino Workers’ Response to Extra-Judicial Killings, the “War on Drugs” and Tax Reform

Filipino migrant workers in Hong Kong and Macau will assemble to discuss the current national situation in the Philippines and its impact on Overseas Filipino Workers. The assembly will tackle issues of drug-related killings that have also victimized family members of Overseas Filipino Workers, the economic programs of the government including the proposed tax reform and its effects on prices of commodities, and policies on migrant workers of the current government. The assembly will craft a plan of action on how Overseas Philipino Workers can respond to these issues.